home
sign in

"you on it, cat!"

From time to time an artist will be sufficiently aware to recognise the effort I'm putting in to make their show as good as can be. When someone appreciates the quality of my work and lets me know that they've noticed, it can make my day, my week, my winter.

scroll to see all 5 blogs

Facemeat - The Musical cum Rock Opera[a blog by mev]


Tonight was a sound engineer's dream job

Posted on Thursday 15th September 2016 at 11:24pm
Updated on  Thursday 15th September 2016 at 11:25pm

Have your say on the feedback loop


Well wow!

For the past two nights I've had the pleasure of working with David Sattout on his new show - a Rock Opera - built around the story of a young Strathfield boy growing up in the company of his aged and wonderful grandmother.

Delightfully written and surprisingly candid, this tale leads from the front and cries out from the back.

David's flinty delivery snaps the audience smash bang into Strathfield in the 1980's and holds them there, in a homemade block and tackle of hope, fear, bewilderment, love and transgression.

My part in the show was front of house and stage audio, sound design, and recording. It was the most interesting thing I've done for a few years. I really got to show off my skills, and for the most part I nailed it.

I had Dave's narration to reinforce, the band needed to sound very bloody good, especially given they are bloody good players and in Ellen Kirkwood's case (trumpet / vocals), writers, and I had sound design pieces to weave into the mix, to support but not intrude upon the magic of the story.

Really looking forward to touring this baby!

0

0

rating


A system upgrade![a blog by mev]


The installation of a single piece of equipment yields a 500% improvement in sound quality.

Posted on Monday 29th August 2016 at 12:54pm
Updated on  Monday 29th August 2016 at 12:54pm

Have your say on the feedback loop


Camelot Lounge, Marrickville.

When I first joined the team, I said I wanted to do a number of things. The most important three on that list were:

1) The installation of a zone processor to deal with the severe phasing and time alignment issues in the room.
2) The installation of new lighting, including colour wash and dimming capable "specials".
3) The installation of a better AV setup to eliminate clunky file browsing and delayed live cam feeds.

I took care of point 2 in relatively short order, with the help of part owner Tony. The improvement in the look of the stage is beyond percentages.

Recently, part owner Yaron and I tackled point 3 and fixed the AV setup.
We can now cue things on a monitor before showing them on the big screen and the latency in the stage cameras is gone, which means we can finally point the cameras at drummers and percussionists without freaking everybody out!

Finally, last week, I took care of point 1.
I've installed a zone processor, and the time alignment and phasing issues in the room have disappeared!
Add to that the fact that each FoH speaker is now EQ'd separately, and what we have there is a great sounding room. It's truly exciting for me because it means that the base level, before I do anything on the mixing desk, is at a really high quality level already, and it just gets better from there.
Venue entertainment programmer Daniel and I tuned the room upon installation, and I have since done another two rounds of fine tuning, finally getting truly happy with it today at lunchtime.

Things are looking better every day!

0

0

rating


Relaxed, Super-Pro Band[a blog by mev]


A band who really loved playing at the club

Posted on Friday 26th August 2016 at 12:57pm

Have your say on the feedback loop


Last night, the band was a country outfit, led by singer Michelle Little.
She sang the songs of Patsy Cline, and really well.
But the way they conducted themselves in soundcheck and at showtime was just a pleasure to be around.

The keys player Doug Boyd was so excited to play on the Yamaha piano, and kept defaulting to classy jazz hits whenever they weren't playing one of the show tunes. He had a grin that covered his whole face, and it was uplifting to see. Because of that, we got a really comprehensive paino check done.

Gary Brown on lap steel had a wonderful old Gibson stereo amp from 1960 - the GA 100 - which I'd never come across before as far as I can recall.

Bob Howe on lead guitar had a Roland cube, but somehow it sounded like something much nicer. His vocal harmonies really sounded great.

On bass was the legendary Allan Tomkins of Tomkins Custom Guitars, who's made guitars for the likes of Tommy and Phil Emmanuel, Keith Urban and a whole bunch of high profile artists worldwide, and played bass with countless country artists. He's a mainstay at Tamworth, and so are his guitars!

Malcolm Hamerston had a magnificent sounding (and looking) drum kit, which I've forgotten the make of, but with most of the night's work done on brushes, the sound was so full and rich it was almost tempting to turn off he mics and just soak it up.

Gentlemen and professionals, and then there's Michelle. She can do Cline in her sleep I reckon, with really good versions of those timeless classics.

A great night was had by all.

Dear Patsy

view image

0

0

rating


Not enough juice?[a blog by mev]


PL4C3B0 Mic technique for trumpet

Posted on Saturday 20th August 2016 at 12:24am

Have your say on the feedback loop


Not enough foldback, even though I could hear it feeding back from ops.
What the hey, have more mics!

609, 57, 421

view image

0

0

rating


When things go right[a blog by mev]


When the band AND the audience love the sound

Posted on Monday 15th August 2016 at 12:40am

Have your say on the feedback loop


Tonight's job was Pena Flamenca, a most excellent flamenco outfit based in Sydney.
We just got it really right in soundcheck, everything sounded absolutely beautiful.
It can be done.

Simon from Pena Flamenca

view image

0

0

rating


© 2008-2016 justMev - All Rights Reserved | Website Development by Mev